Moods of the Sky

I love the sky.

I love the backdrop it provides for our lowly activities, like birdwatching, and smiling.

Canadian Geese, Eastern Ontario

Canadian Geese, Eastern Ontario

Sky 3

The sky reflected on the van in this photo of my daughters

I love how picturesque and pastoral the sky can be.

Contentment- but is that the beginning of storm clouds?

Contentment- but is that the beginning of storm clouds?

I love the mystery of the night sky,

Moon over fields and brush, Leeds & Grenville, ON

Moon over fields and brush, Leeds & Grenville, ON

and the surprises that it showcases.

Rainbow, Leeds & Grenville, ON

Rainbow, Leeds & Grenville, ON

I love the drama.

Technicolour Sky over the Confederation Bridge going onto Prince Edward Island

Technicolour Sky over the Confederation Bridge going onto Prince Edward Island

I love the storms.

A story builds over the TransCanada in Northern New Brunswick

A storm builds over the TransCanada HIghway in Northern New Brunswick

 

Clouds building over farm, Leeds & Grenville County, ON

Clouds building over farm, Leeds & Grenville County, ON

 

Storm Brewing, Leeds & Grenville County, ON

Storm Brewing, Leeds & Grenville County, ON

I love the boldness.

View from my deck

View from my deck

And at the end of the day, I really love the serenity.

Sun over the St. Lawrence, Riviere du Loup, PQ

Sun over the St. Lawrence, Riviere du Loup, PQ

 

Soothing Bay of Fundy Sunset

Soothing Bay of Fundy Sunset, Nova Scotia

 

 Calm Bay of Fundy Sky

Calm Bay of Fundy Sky, Nova Scotia

I once read about a woman who survived World War II in a prison cell by looking at the sliver of sky she could see between the bars. When the war was over, she said the sky kept her alive. Gave her hope.

I believe her.

It gives me hope too.

 

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Picking Mayflowers

I have such crisp memories of picking wild mayflowers with my brother. Scrounging around on the sun-splashed forest floor, moving decaying leaves with our bare hands to find a delicately scented flower smaller than a dime.

Trailing arbutus are not easy to find; their flowers tend to hide under the leaves. It takes quite a few flowers to make even a small bunch, but they were worth it. When we could find mayflowers, we knew summer was just around the corner. I especially remember the strong scent of wintergreen berries, squished underfoot. I can even now smell the scent of broken ferns under the giant pines. So fresh was the cool spring air, so invigorating was it to be outside exploring after the wait of winter.

Mayflowers (trailing arbutus). Photo from the Canadian Museum of Nature.

Trailing arbutus… waxy thick leaves, flowers with a hint of pink… it has quite a history. In Nova Scotia, it was declared the provincial flower in 1901, and was in use in publications as far back as 1825. According to the Canadian Heritage website, the mayflower was seen as a patriotic symbol- perhaps suggesting achievement in the face of adversity. It appeared on the buttons of the Nova Scotia militia, and on postage stamps along with the rose, the thistle and the shamrock.

These little flowers can only grow in the presence of a certain fungus, and they do not easily propagate. So delicate, yet so strong. Achievement in the face of adversity.  It is a picture of life and beauty, don’t you think? Despite the challenges we face,  there is beauty in abundance… even if we have to hunt for it.

So spend some time outside this spring, especially with those you love. Marvel at the beauty you discover together. And give thanks.